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By Caselli, Daniela; Beckett, Samuel; Dante Alighieri

Beckett's Dantes: Intertextuality within the fiction and feedback is the 1st research in English at the literary courting among Beckett and Dante. it really is an cutting edge examining of Samuel Beckett and Dante's works and a severe engagement with modern theories of intertextuality. the quantity translates Dante within the unique Italian (as apparently in Beckett), translating into English all Italian quotations. It Read more...

summary: Beckett's Dantes: Intertextuality within the fiction and feedback is the 1st research in English at the literary dating among Beckett and Dante. it's an leading edge examining of Samuel Beckett and Dante's works and a severe engagement with modern theories of intertextuality. the quantity translates Dante within the unique Italian (as it sounds as if in Beckett), translating into English all Italian quotations. It merits from a multilingual process in response to Beckett's released works in English and French, and on manuscripts (which use English, French, German and Italian). The e-book is aimed a

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2 Samuel Beckett, Dream of Fair to Middling Women (New York: Arcade, 1993), p. 51. Subsequent references are given in the text. The typescript of Dream reads ‘the Fiorentia edition in the ignoble Salviani’ (RUL MS 1227/7/16/8). For a more detailed discussion see Daniela Caselli, ‘“The Florentia edition in the ignoble Salani collection”: a textual comparison’, Journal of Beckett Studies, 9:2 (2001), 1–20. 3 James Knowlson, Damned to Fame: The Life of Samuel Beckett (London: Bloomsbury, 1996), pp.

450. ), The Foucault Reader (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1984), pp. 101–120. 16 Cesare Segre, ‘Intertestuale, interdiscorsivo: appunti per una fenomenologia delle fonti’, in C. Di Girolamo and I. Paccagnella (eds), La parola ritrovata: fonti e analisi letteraria (Palermo: Sellerio, 1982), pp. 15–28. 17 Samuel Beckett, Mercier and Camier (London: Picador, 1988), p. ), Disjecta: Miscellaneous Writings and a Dramatic Fragment (New York: Grove Press, 1984), p. 29. 18 Harold Bloom, The Anxiety of Influence (New York: Oxford University Press, 1973).

The quotations from Purgatorio VI, 118 and XXXII, 149, together with a reference to the punishment of the three popes Niccolò III, Bonifacio VIII, and Clemente V (all appearing in Inferno XIX, 46–87) are examples of Dante’s explicit attacks against the Church of his time. The ‘storm of ecclesiastical abuse’ raised by Dante and Joyce indicates that both authors break accepted conventions of the Catholic Church, whose rage against Dante is illustrated by the following assertion, paraphrased from a section of Boccaccio’s Trattatello: ‘De Monarshia’ [sic] was burnt publicly under Pope Giovanni XXII at the istigation of Cardinal Beltrando and the bones of its author would have suffered the same fate but for the interference of an influential man of letters, Pino della Tosa.

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