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By Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Food and Nutrition Board, Planning Committee for a Workshop on Potential Health Hazards Associated with Consumption of Caffeine in Food and Dietary Supplements, Diana Pankevich, Ann L. Yaktine, Lesli

''Caffeine in nutrients and supplements is the precis of a workshop convened by way of the Institute of drugs in August 2013 to check the to be had technological know-how on secure degrees of caffeine intake in meals, drinks, and supplements and to spot information gaps. Scientists with services in foodstuff defense, food, pharmacology, psychology, toxicology, and similar disciplines; doctors with pediatric Read more...

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The researchers were consistent with previous ILSI work with respect to the types of beverages included in each beverage category with one notable exception: energy drinks and energy shots were included as separate beverage categories. Neither was considered in the 1999 ILSI survey; energy drinks were not introduced into the market until 1997. Although Mitchell and colleagues analyzed total caffeine intakes for all age groups across all categories, because coffee, carbonated soft drinks, tea, and energy drinks contributed approximately 98 percent or more of the caffeine consumed, Mitchell presented data only for those four categories.

Second, there was a slight increase in the amount of coffee consumed (by fluid ounce) and a decrease in the amount of carbonated soft drinks consumed, and carbonated soft drinks have less caffeine. Third, the database values used for the more recent survey reflect higher caffeine values for specialty brand coffees, which may also have contributed. A notable finding of the survey was the low consumption of energy drinks. Energy drinks were relatively new to the marketplace in 1999, and thus their intake was not estimated in the previous survey.

Most age groups showed flat regression lines over time, meaning that 100 90 80 mg, Caffeine 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2–11 12–17 18–29 30–34 35–39 40–49 50–59 60+ Years 200 mg, Caffeine 180 160 10th 140 120 25th 100 50th 80 60 75th 40 90th 20 0 2–11 12–17 18–29 30–34 35–39 40–49 50–59 60+ Years FIGURE 2-3 Mean and percentiles of usual caffeine intake (mg) per consumption event. SOURCE: NHANES. INTAKE AND EXPOSURE TO CAFFEINE 25 caffeine intake has remained relatively stable over the past decade. 01).

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